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White Horse Inn: Conversational Theology

God’s Grace vs. Human Striving

In Genesis 29, Jacob the deceiver is himself deceived. Though he had intended to marry Rachel, he was first tricked into marrying her older sister. Later, as she struggles with infertility, Rachel gives Jacob her maidservant to be a kind of surrogate mother. When two sons are born to her in this way, Rachel believes that she has “wrestled with God and her sister and prevailed.” But if, according to Paul, Sarah and Hagar represent covenants of grace and works, what are we to think about the events recorded here? On this program Shane Rosenthal discusses the implications of Genesis 29 and 30 with Adriel Sanchez, host of Core Christianity.

Show Quote:

Throughout the book of Genesis God uses unexpected people—those with messy lives. He also consistently works against all odds, such as in situations where there is complete bareness, in order to show that it’s not something that his people can bring about in their own strength. But in his own good time, the Lord graciously breaks in and eventually accomplishes all that he has promised.

Adriel Sanchez

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Living in the Grip of Relentless Grace

Author: Iain Duguid

Time and time again, God uses insignificant and desperately sinful people to fulfill his marvelous plans. In short, he uses people like us! We find vivid examples of this truth in Isaac and Jacob, two men who couldn’t live up to Abraham’s example, let alone God’s standards – yet God never abandoned them. Iain Duguid’s study of their stories in Genesis shows us how the gospel triumphs not through human effort but through God’s relentless grace. His exposition and application will encourage readers who grapple with their shortcomings in the light of Christ, as well as aid teachers in tracing the golden gospel thread woven through the Old Testament.

Putting Amazing Back into Grace

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