A production of Sola Media
White Horse Inn: Conversational Theology

Grace & Works Contrasted

Release date:

June 6, 2021

In his Genesis commentary, Walter Brueggemann notes that in chapters 16 to 18, Abraham and Sarah “are not offered as models of faith but as models of disbelief.” In this part of the narrative, he says, “the call is not embraced, but is rejected as non-sensical.” This helps to explain why the couple sought to fulfill God’s promise with Hagar’s assistance. But as Paul explains in Galatians chapter 4, this entire narrative is a tale of two covenants: one of grace, and another of works. Shane Rosenthal talks with Mike Brown about these issues and more as we continue our series on the Gospel in Genesis.

Show Quote:

There are only two kinds of religions in the world – one that seeks righteousness by keeping the law and one that seeks righteousness through faith in Christ. With the exception of Christianity, all of the religions in the world with their pursuits of enlightenment, salvation or self-realization fall into the first category, the category of trusting in self, in one’s own obedience. It’s a religion of human ascent that tries to earn God’s blessing through personal effort rather that receiving God’s blessing by grace through faith alone.

Mike Brown

Recommended:

Living in the Gap Between Promise and Reality

Author: Iain Duguid

God made Abraham glorious promises, but the patriarch still spent years living in a gap between their fulfillment and his day-to-day reality. We can often relate to him. Working through the Genesis account, Iain Duguid shows how Abraham, in both his faith and failure, points to Jesus and the gospel, providing an example and a profound encouragement for us today.

Introducing Covenant Theology

Author: Michael Horton

Since biblical times, history is replete with promises made and promises broken. Pastors and teachers know the power of the covenant, and they know that understanding the concept of covenant is crucial to understanding Scripture. They also know that covenant theology provides the foundation for core Christian beliefs and that covenants in their historical context hold significance even today. But to laypeople and new Christians, the eternal implications of “cutting” a covenant with God can be complicating.

This is premium content: Sign up for a Free White Horse Inc Account

Sign up for a free account and receive access to the latest 12 weeks of resources. Become a Partner and access the archives